John Andersen: Sheriff candidates should run on issues, not philosophy | Columnists

Well, St. Patrick’s Day is approaching and Daylight Savings Time begins tomorrow, March 13. Don’t forget to put your clocks forward one hour and change the batteries in your smoke detectors.

Not to mention there will likely be a Chippewa County Sheriff’s Run in November. A variety of people consider running.

Why the offices of the sheriff, clerk of the courts, county clerk, coroner, registry of deeds, county treasurer are political offices is beyond me. I do not know. A simple explanation is that they are in the Constitution of Wisconsin and the wisdom or lack of wisdom of our ancestors is reflected in that choice.

I have known and worked with every Sheriff in Chippewa County since 1980. They were generally friendly people and all knowledgeable. Some were quite colorful, others were more of an administrative type.

Sheriffs run the jail, watch the prisoners in the jail, attend court, sign documents and writs, To enforce in the county all general orders of the Department of Security and Professional Services relating to the sale, transportation and storage of explosives and assisting the county coroner.

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The sheriffs conduct operations in the county and, where the council so provides, in the waters over which the county has jurisdiction under s. 2.04; for the rescue of human beings and for the recovery of human bodies. Sheriffs conduct sales of property seized by the county, banks, and federal courts.

Finally, sheriffs enforce all city or town ordinances within a city or town, in which the sheriff provides law enforcement services under a contract. Ironically, a Wisconsin county coroner can act as sheriff if there is no sheriff or the sheriff is in jail.

According to Chippewa County Clerk Jaclyn Sadler, Wisconsin, you must be at least 18 years old and registered to vote in the county in which you are running. However, you do not need to be a sworn law enforcement officer. to run.

Currently, there are three candidates for the position of sheriff:. Travis Hakes (R), Chris Kowalczyk (R) and Dan Marcon (R-Constitutional Sheriff). I know them all, each brings their own experience to work.

Marcon said that by running for sheriff as a Republican, he will serve as a constitutional sheriff. In the Herald on Feb. 23, Marcon spoke about the constitutional sheriff issue this way, “‘You can’t split that, he said she said Democratic or Republican stuff,'” Marcon said. “I am running as a Republican, but as a constitutional sheriff first. We need someone who will stand up against the excesses of the government. I’m not going to be the sheriff who’s going to come into your business and tell you that you have to shut down.

A few problems arise. First, there is no such office as a constitutional sheriff. The Constitutional Sheriff is a philosophy, not an office. This philosophy is described as follows: “Constitutional sheriffs hold that their authority goes beyond law enforcement to determine what the law is. to the local police, but also to the officers and agents of the federal government

“It rests on a very selective reading of history, claiming that the high sheriff of the English county was transplanted to colonial America and then somehow emerged into the present day untouched by the legal developments over the past 200 years.” American Bar Journal, December 2022. (Debra Cassens Weiss)

Second, unfortunately, a county sheriff is required to do their duty, which can include telling a business to close for various reasons. The sheriff’s office is part of the government. If people don’t want to be in government, they probably shouldn’t work for government or run for elected office in government.

Sheriff candidates should run on issues, not philosophy. The sheriff’s office requires the individual to protect the health, safety, and welfare of all state residents. With this office comes the responsibility to enforce all laws, whether you agree with them or not.